This guide has been written for the Leyland Mini GTS, a unique South African model which was produced as a higher performance successor to the Mini 1275 GT at the Blackheath plant in Capetown.1 The GTS has several unique features which make it a particularly desirable model in the Mini range, although awareness of this model in markets outside of South Africa remains limited. Classic Register hosts a Mini GTS Register here, and we encourage current owners to add their vehicle or contact us so we can further build the register and learn more about the finer details of these cars.

At the time the GTS was built, local content regulations significantly influenced manufacturing in the South African automotive industry. Those rules provided import excise rebates and tariff protections for manufacturers where certain local content levels (as a percentage of vehicle weight) were achieved.2 By the time GTS production began in July 1973, local content accounted for over 55% in South African Minis, reaching 65% in 1975.3 As a result, the GTS received several parts and components not strictly in line with Mini manufacturing in the UK and other markets. Most notably, the decision to locally cast a version of the Cooper S engine for use in the GTS was a major benefit to the car, considering that by 1973 the Cooper S specification 1275cc unit had been phased out in other international markets.4

The performance specifications of the car made the GTS competitive on the track, and the cars had a successful career in South African touring car racing. The GTS competed in championships such as the Asseng Group 1 Championship and the Castrol Marketcars Standard Production Championship. The GTS achieved multiple class wins in the 1970s, and took the Asseng Group 1 Championship title in 1976. Numerous drivers successfully competed in the GTS throughout a number of seasons, and Ryno Verster's book Thanks for the Mini Memories - A South African Mini Story provides a good level of detail with respect to the various motorsport achievements of these GTS cars and their drivers. See Section 7 of this guide for relevant extracts from Mr Verster's book, which have been placed on this page with his kind permission.

Period of manufacture:

July 1973 – March 19805

Production Numbers:6

Most sources confirm that 4,2107 GTS cars were produced in total. The following production by year breakdown was confirmed by another source which suggests the total number is 4,212.8

Year

Price new

(South African Rand)

Production numbers
1973 R 2,280 365
1974 R 2,365 734
1975 R 2,595 795
1976 R 3,175 765
1977 R 3,500 632
1978 R 3,865 658
1979 R 4,215 263


1. Exterior features - Leyland Mini GTS

The GTS was based on the MK3 body shell as shared with the Mini 1275 GT it replaced.9 This body featured internal door hinges, and all GTS models were fitted with the 'square front' design. A number of cosmetic changes were made to the accessories applied to the GTS at multiple points throughout the production period, and these changes have been summarised in this section.

  • The GTS was available in a large number of single tone colours, with contrasting body stripe decals that run over the bonnet and down the sides of the car with “GTS” script integrated in the decal at the tail ends. We have not found any information suggesting these were a 'delete option' and therefore the assumption is that they were applied to all GTS vehicles. Decals were available in Gold, Silver or Black (depending on the paint colour of the vehicle.10 These decals had two thin outer stripes (5mm) and one central inner-stripe (32mm) down the side of the vehicle, stretching to a total width of 165mm as it ran over the front guards and bonnet.11 These were similar to but not the same as those applied to the Australian Clubman GT. See section 3 of this guide for further details regarding the available GTS decals and stripes.
  • Wheel arch flare support panels were spot-welded to the wheel arches, covered with plastic flares and a PVC chrome-plastic finishing strip was applied over the seam, held on by body tabs.
  • Front bumper under-riders were fitted to all cars.12
  • Some vehicles (dates unconfirmed) had a small square Leyland badge applied to the lower A pillar, behind the front wheel arch.​ This was not applied to all vehicles, and we note that we have sighted both early and late vehicles which have not had the badge fitted. None of the vehicles sighted during our research from 1976 onward have been fitted with this badge, but further sampling is needed to make a firm conclusion.13
  • A lockable fuel cap was introduced in July 1975.14
  • Semi-sealed halogen headlamps were introduced on the GTS in July 1975.15
  • A tinted and laminated windscreen was introduced from April 1977, along with a rear window made from toughened glass.16
  • For the 1979 model year vehicles, wiper blades and arms were painted matt-black, and a black plastic roof line gutter finishing strip was fitted (earlier vehicle wiper blades were exposed stainless steel, and had no roof gutter trim applied). Further, the roof gutter design changed slightly for the final production year, with the drip strip that ran along the gutter being removed.17

 

Front grille:

  • Two grille designs applied over the GTS production period. Both grilles were painted matt black, with exposed / unpainted aluminium frame sections. As with other South Aftican models, the grille received white circular reflectors. The design of each grille is explained below, with labelled images provided in the gallery for further description.
    • Pre-April 197718 vehicles had a grille with the vertical shield shaped badge with "MINI" script cast at the top of the badge. The grille itself was painted matt black, whilst the outer rim of the frame, and two horizontal strips of the grille received a chrome like finish (exposed aluminium).  
    • April 1977 onward19 vehicles replaced the shield badge with a flat panel painted the same matt black as the grille, with an exposed aluminium frame in the centre. A small Leyland symbol was applied to the left of the "Mini" text on the badge panel - both of which stood out in aluminium finish on the black background. The grille design was slightly revised, retaining the matt-black centre finish with outer edge of exposed aluminium, but now applied the exposed aluminium finish to the centre horizontal bars through the middle of the grille, which flowed with the badge panel and frame.
  • A square "Mini GTS" badge (the same as the early badges applied to the trunk lid) was applied to the passenger side front grille. This badge was fitted to both grille designs up to the end of August 1978, after which it was no longer applied. Prior to April 1977, this badge was placed on the lower half of the passenger-side grille,20 and from April 1977, it was fitted to the upper half of the passenger-side grille.21 See the examples in the images demonstrating the different positions.22

 

Side mirrors:

  • Early cars, prior to April 1977, are believed to have not received a side mirror as standard, despite promotional material suggesting a 'bullit' style mirror was applied.23 A bullit mirror or other style may have been a dealer-fitted option on vehicles, however, we have no references to support this assumption. 
  • Cars from April 197724 through to September 1978 received a single chrome door mirrror on the driver's side. 
  • From September 1978  until production end, twin door-mirrors were applied and painted matt-black.25

 

Tail lights:

  • Reverse lights fitted to vehicles prior to July 1975 are subject to debate. Several vehicles have been sighted with a centrally located reverse light in chrome housing fitted under the rear bumper.26 However, we have also received information from an owner who purchased a new GTS in 1973, confirming no reverse lamp was fitted. This could suggest the lamps may have been optional / dealer fitted items, and not standard equipment. 
  • Vehicles built between 1975 and April 1977 had black plastic reverse lamp pods fitted on the rear beaver/valance panel (under the rear bumper). These lamps were the same as those applied to the Leyland / Morris Marina.27
  • Tail lights prior to April 1977 had small red circular reflectors fitted.28
  • From April 1977 onward, the final iteration of the GTS saw the larger MK3 tail lamps installed which integrated a reverse lamp. These lamps also had an integrated square reflector, meaning the round reflectors applied to earlier models were no longer necessary.29

 

Wheels and tyres:

  • Vehicles built prior to July 1975 had pressed steel 10 x 4.5 inch Rostyle wheels30 with 8 ventilation holes, fitted with 165 SR10 tyres. From July 197531 (to accommodate larger 8.4 inch disc brakes), all GTS vehicles were fitted with pressed steel 12 x 4.5 inch wheels. These were fitted with 145/70/12 tyres, and had plastic wheel covers with Leyland badged centre caps (these were the same wheel covers as applied to the post-1974 British 1275 GT, the Mini 25th Anniversary and the Australian Mini 1275 LS). The wheel nuts on these larger wheels were originally fitted with black plastic caps, and had special plastic washers fitted to retain the wheel covers.

 

Boot lid badging:

  • A small square badge was applied to the rear trunk lid (centre) stating “Mini GTS”. The rear GTS badge received several design changes over time. Please note; the date of changeover has been estimated based on cars sighted during research. Should any readers have further information, please contact us.
    • Early badge: Cars (possibly up to 1975) received an aluminium style badge with black “Mini" and red "GTS” text printed on top.
    • Later badges: Cars from 1975/1976 onward had two possible badge designs. The first had Black “Mini” text over an aluminium background (left side) and a lower case Aluminium “gts” text over a black background (right side). The second badge has aluminium “Mini” text over a black background (left side) and lower case black “gts” text over an aluminium background (right side).
2. Interior features - Leyland Mini GTS

General features and changes:

  • Front seatbelts were fitted standard on all year models, however, no rear seatbelts were ever fitted to the GTS.32
  • A revised sun-visor design was introduced in July 1975, with the passenger side visor now incorporating a vanity mirror.33
  • From April 1977, slightly larger / more rounded brake and clutch pedals were fitted.34
  • For the 1979 model year (from Sep 1978), a dipping rear view mirror was fitted (the previous type did not have this functionality).35
  • A revised handbrake grip was introduced for the 1979 model year (from September 1978).36 We are currently seeking image examples for comparison.
  • In March 1977, a heated rear window, hazard warning lights and tinted windscreen were introduced.37
  • A vinyl mat was originally fitted in the trunk, covering the spare wheel and battery.38

 

Steering wheels:

  • A 3-spoke leather-wrapped sports steering wheel was fitted to the GTS throughout all years, however, it is broadly understood that two different styles were fitted.39
  • Cars prior to September 1978 received a larger diameter steering wheel with polished aluminium spokes containing 5 drill-holes of descending sizes, and a soft plastic centre-boss containing an Austin badge.40 These wheels are believed to be the same as applied to the Austin 1300 GT.
  • Later steering wheels (from September 1978 onward)41 were also leather wrapped 3-spoke wheels with aluminium spokes, but are differentiated from the earlier wheels by their thicker rim and smaller diameter. It appears that several designs were applied to the spokes of these later wheels, with some receiving drilled spokes and others not. A soft plastic centre-boss was also applied, housing a Leyland centre badge.
  • A Steering lock was introduced in July 1975. This coincided with the re-positioning of the vehicle's ignition on the right of the steering column.42

 

Instrument cluster:

  • A 3-pod instrument cluster was fitted standard containing fuel/temp, speedometer and tachometer instruments (same layout as the 1275 GT).
  • The 200km/h speedometer showed km/h units with mph on the inner circle43
  • The tachometer fitted was an 8,000 RPM unit. The redline on vehicles prior to July 1975 was 6,500 RMP, and from July 1975 onward was moved down to 6,000 RPM.44

 

Lower-dash switch panel, heater and other controls:

  • A heater/demister was always standard equipment on the GTS. Prior to July 1975, the GTS was fitted with a single-speed heater/fan/demister. A revised design 3-speed heater/fan/demister was fitted from July 1975 onward.45
  • The pre-July 1975 GTS central lower dash switch panel housed the cars ignition switch button, and rocker switches controlling the windscreen wipers, headlamps and heater, with a pull-control for the choke.46
  • From July 1975, a hazard warning lamp switch was added, with the switch fitted on the far left side of the central dash switch panel. This switch was put in the position of the ignition switch, which from July 1975 onward was moved to the right side of the steering column.47
  • From April 1977, an additional switch was added to the central dashboard switch panel for the heated rear window.48
  • Prior to April 1977, the indicator stalk was on the right-hand side of the steering column, and also served as a high beam dipper switch and push-horn. There was no stalk on the left side of the steering wheel in these earlier cars.49
  • From April 1977 onward, a stalk was introduced on the left side of the steering column, operating the two-speed wipers and electronic windscreen washers.50

 

Trim types and colours (seats, door cards and carpets):51

  • Up to September 1978, the GTS used the same seats/trim as the 1275 GT. Sighted original colours include black, white, tan/brown, beige and red (burgundy). All seats on vehicles prior to September 1978 are trimmed in full vinyl. The front seats have 9 thin horizontal insert-pleats on the seat back, and 8 on the squabs. The rear seats have 11 thin horizontal insert-pleats on the seat back, and 8 on the squabs.
  • For the 1979 model year (From September 1978), a new seat design was introduced with a single hole in the top for a headrest. The GTS was never fitted with headrests, however, we have been informed that certain BMC headrests do fit the seats. These later model GTS cars were offered with a trim material combination of vinyl outer edge panels with cloth insert pleats. The front seats had 5 vertical cloth pleats on the back and squab, and the back seats had 7 vertical pleats (on each seat) on both the back and squab. Only two colours have been sighted; beige vinyl with cream insert pleats and tan vinyl with beige insert pleats. See the examples in the images.
  • Earlier vehicles (possibly prior to July 1975) had one piece front and one piece rear fitted carpets. Later vehicles (possibly from July 1975 onward) had 3-piece front and 3-piece rear carpets.52
  • Carpets fitted were loop pile and had a felt underlay. The carpets we've so far sighted in pre-1975 models have all been black, whilst the later model carpets have had two different shades of brown. Further research is needed to confirm the precise colour options. The carpets had an integrated “Leyland” rubber heel pad in the front on the driver’s side.
3. Paint colour options - Leyland Mini GTS

Paint code location prior to April 1977:

Based on vehicles sighted during our research, it appears that pre-April 1977 vehicles did not have a paint colour or indicated anywhere on the vehicle, and restorers will have to rely on assessing a car's original paint to determine the colour specification. 

Paint code location (From April 1977 onward):

The original paint colour applied to a post-April 1977 GTS should appear reverse stamped into the vehicle's body tag (welded to the rear passenger-side parcel shelf). Interestingly, we have sighted two blue paint names on data plates we've sighted: (1) "Sapph Blue" (which we assume is short for Sapphire Blue, (2) "Balt Blue" (which is perhaps short for Baltic Blue). We've also sighted "A/Green" and "ALO White" - although it's unclear what these last two could be short for. Despite having different short form names, these colours presumably correspond with (respectively) Pale Dark Blue, Royal Blue, Metallic Green and of course, White (as listed in the table below).

Several enthusiasts have noted that original paint colours may be referenced in several other places in production crayon marker. One location sighted is on the back seat vertical panel/bulkhead. This was likely used during production to ensure panels were correctly matched, however, we have not been able to obtain any images confirming this.53

Paint colours available:54

The following list of colours has been taken from Ryno Verster's research, combined with an assessment of numerous vehicles sighted during research which are believed to be factory original. Unfortunately, factory paint colours and codes were rarely published for the GTS Minis,55 and we have only been able to attempt to match colour descriptions with the vehicles shown in the images to the best of our assessment ability. Therefore, please use caution if relying on the labelled images. Should you have any further information with respect to the original GTS paint colours, please get in contact with us so we can update this section for everyone's benefit.

Paint colour Paint code Sighted trim Stripe decal Years available
White (possibly also Opal White) n/a TBC Black n/a
Bright Yellow n/a TBC Black n/a
Pale Yellow n/a Brown Black n/a
Light Powder Blue n/a TBC Black n/a
Pale Dark Blue (possibly also called Sapphire Blue or Zircon Blue n/a Brown, black or White Gold or silver n/a
Racing Green n/a Tan Gold n/a
Royal Blue (May also be referred to as Baltic Blue) n/a TBC Gold or silver n/a
Chocolate Brown n/a TBC Black n/a
Metallic Dark Brown n/a TBC Black or gold TBC
Bright Red n/a TBC Black or gold n/a
Metallic Green n/a TBC Gold n/a
Silver n/a TBC Black n/a
Burnt Orange n/a Beige Black n/a
Pitch Black n/a White Gold n/a
Geranium n/a Black Black n/a
Cameo n/a Red Black n/a
Bright Orange n/a Black or tan n/a From mid 70s
Lime Green n/a Black or tan n/a From mid 70s
Bright Blue n/a Black or tan n/a From mid 70s

 

4. Chassis number / VIN - Leyland Mini GTS

The format of the GTS chassis number will depend on the vehicle's build date as outlined below:56

Early vehicles (possibly up to July 1975):

These early vehicles were issued a unique 7-digit "Car Number", and a unique 4-digit "Body Number", both of which were prefixed by the early GTS prefix "XAD2S".

1. The Car Number is stamped into an aluminium tag pop riveted to the driver's side front slam panel (under the bonnet).

2. The Body Number is stamped into a separate aluminium tag riveted to the driver's side front slam panel (under the bonnet), and was also reverse stamped into a body tag welded to the passenger's side front slam panel. Body tags have a wavering edge as shown in the images.

 

Mid-production vehicles (possibly from July 1975 - August 1978):

These mid-production cars were also issued the same 7-digit "Car Number", and a unique 4-digit "Body Number" as the early vehicles, both of which were again prefixed by the early GTS prefix "XAD2S". The relevant numbers for these vehicles can be found in the following locations:

1. The Car Number is stamped into an aluminium tag pop-riveted to the driver's side front slam panel (under the bonnet).

2. The Body Number is stamped into a separate aluminium tag riveted to the driver's side front slam panel (under the bonnet). 

3. The reverse stamped body tag, however, was relocated to the rear passenger parcel shelf (the same location as post-August 1978 vehicles). The body tags had a wavering edge as shown in the images.

 

Vehicles from September 1978 onward:

The later GTS vehicles changed their coding system, and were issued a unique 6-digit "Serial Number" a unique 7-digit "Chassis Number", and the GTS "Model Code" was changed to "1144BA":

1. All three codes are located on a single data plate on the driver's side slam panel (under the bonnet).

2. The Model Code and the vehicle's Serial Number were also reverse stamped into a body tag welded to the passenger's side rear parcel shelf. The body tags had a wavering edge as shown in the images. This tag also contains the stamping "GTS" and the vehicle's original paint colour name.

5. Engine number - Leyland Mini GTS

Engine number:

The GTS has an engine prefix of “12H-GTS-H”, followed by a 4 digit unique engine number. This prefix and number is reverse stamped on an aluminium plate riveted to the engine block as demonstrated in the images. The 4 digit engine number is also stamped into the engine block face just above the oil filter, below the head, and should match the unique engine number on the engine tag.57

 

Engine block and head characteristics:

The GTS received a 1275cc engine of very similar specification to the Cooper S. The block was locally cast in South Africa by Gearings Foundry in Epping, Cape Town - using the British-spec MK2 Cooper S engine as a template.58 This local production contributed to the GTS achieving local content benchmarks to reduce taxation duties.59 The decision to build these engines also meant that South Africa became the only country to continue using a Cooper S spec engine block through the 1970s, whilst elsewhere that motor was phased out and replaced by the rationalised 1275cc motors with a solid rear block wall (for example, that used in the 1275 GT). The closest factory built engine of the era in terms of power was that applied to the Innocenti Mini (1300 Export).60 This used a 1300 GT engine and several Cooper S accessories such as twin SU carburettors, and was built up to 1975. This was still down in power terms at 70bhp, vs the 74bhp of the GTS.61

Like the Cooper S, the GTS engine was an 11-stud unit, had integral side covers and the head received double valve springs. The head had an inlet valve diameter of 35.65mm, and  an exhaust valve diameter of 29.37mm. The block was bored to the same specifications as the Cooper S, with a 70.64mm bore, and a stroke of 81.33mm to achieve the 1275cc. The compression ratio was also 9.75:1. Unique to the South African engines, however, was the location of the oil filter gallery, which meant the oil filter was fitted above the starter motor. Despite the similar specifications, the GTS produced 74bhp, (slightly down on the original Cooper S).

Engine blocks and heads were finished in a semi-gloss grey/black paint. We have not yet been able to confirm the paint code.  For additional performance figures and mechanical specifications of the GTS engine, see section 6 of this guide below.62

6. Mechanical features and performance figures - Leyland Mini GTS
  • Engine: 4-cylinder, 1275cc pushrod 8-valve. Head fitted with double valve springs and 35mm inlet valves / 29mm exhaust, fed by twin 1 ¼ HS2 SU carburettors, and using a free-flow exhaust. The correct original part number for the twin-carb manifold is “12G2464”, and Unipart filters were originally used in the air box.
  • Bore: 70.64mm, stroke: 81.33mm, compression ratio: 9.75:1.63
  • Maximum power: 74bhp/55kw (at 5,800 RPM) / 103 N.m of torque (at 3,500rpm).64
  • Maximum speed: 155 km/h / 96 mph (10 inch wheels), 149 km/h / 93 mph (12 inch wheels).65
  • 4-speed full synchromesh manual transmission with the following drive ratios (1974):66
    • 1st gear: 3.52:1
    • 2nd gear: 2.21:1
    • 3rd gear: 1.43:1
    • 4th gear: Direct (1:1)
    • Reverse gear: 3.54:1
    • Final Drive: 3.44:1
  • Prior to July 1975, 10 x 4.5 inch Rostyle wheels were fitted with 7.5 inch (190mm) servo assisted disc brakes. The 7.5 inch disc brakes were supported by a Lockheed servo/brake booster (these appear to be the same type as applied to the 1275 GT and MK3 Cooper S, but this needs confirming. We note that Ryno Verster states that this was a different Booster than fitted to the Cooper S models, but perhaps this was with reference to the MK2 Cooper S.67 The brake booster was mounted from a bracket on the inner-mudguard. 
  • From July 1975, new 8.4 inch (210mm) disc brakes were introduced, and a brake booster was therefore no longer fitted to the GTS.68 To accommodate the larger brakes, 12 x 5 inch wheels were fitted, receiving plastic wheel covers trims (same wheel covers as applied to many 1275 GT models and the Australian 1275 LS). The 12-inch wheels had a flat plate welded to the back of the hub for additional strength.
  • Rear brakes throughout all years were 178mm drums, which had a built-in spacer to replicate the track of the front disc brakes.69
  • Dual circuit brakes are believed to have been introduced from late 1977, or early 1978 (TBC). The first split-circuit brake system (up to September 1978) was split between the front and back brakes, and the later system (from September 1978 onward) had the circuit split diagonally.70
  • A 36 litre long range fuel tank was fitted to all GTS vehicles.71
  • Dry (rubber cone) suspension was used throughout all years.72
  • Semi-sealed halogen headlamps were fitted to the GTS from July 1975 onward.
  • Inner-pot joints were used rather than the earlier rubber universal joints
  • An SU electric fuel pump was mounted in rear sub-frame.
  • An improved clutch release bearing was introduced from July 1975.73
  • A duplex timing chain was used up until July 1975. From July 1975 onwards, a single row chain was applied.74
  • A Banana branch was fitted to the free-flow exhaust system.75
7. Original documentation / promotional material and Ryno Verster's book extracts - Leyland Mini GTS

Attached is a small collection of original brochures / advertisements for the Mini GTS. They are displayed here for historical purposes and Classic Register claims no ownership of these documents. If any readers have copies of early documentation (such as brochures, advertisements or specification sheets), please contact us so we can display the information for the benefit of enthusiasts.

8. References - Leyland Mini GTS

 

This guide has been drafted to assist prospective buyers or enthusiasts looking for further information on the Mini GTS. The guide has been written based on a variety of published books, online sources and enthusiast input. However, you should not rely on this guide to make any purchasing decision and we make no representation that all information is accurate. You should always seek independent professional advice when looking to purchase a unique car. If you have additional information, photographs or corrections you believe need to be made to this page, please contact us by clicking the button at the top of this page, or comment below, so we can improve this guide for the benefit of enthusiasts.

The following sources (as referenced in the text), among input from many owners and enthusiasts, have contributed to the creation of this page. A particular thanks to those from the GTS Facebook Page, and Ryno Verster, who has kindly provided his permission to display extracts from his book below, which contained vital information for this guide. If you have any further information you believe can be added, please let us know by contacting us or commenting below.

1. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story.

2. As detailed in Issue 26, The Mini Experience (Extract found at: http://www.bmcexperience.com.au/issue-26/1275gt), referencing Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story.

3. As detailed in Issue 26, The Mini Experience (Extract found at: http://www.bmcexperience.com.au/issue-26/1275gt), referencing Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story.

4. Based on knowledge that the Clubman GT used the Cooper S engine until late 1972, and the MK3 Cooper S used a rationalised 1275cc, as did other 1275cc minis (such as the 1275 GT and the Innocenti Cooper 1300 Export which had the 1300GT motor).

5. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the MiniOver 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159. See also Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.103.

6. See January 1974 Issue, Car Magazine South Africa, and see also MM Older Vehicle Production Digest - Cars and LDVs Pre-77, and confirmed by Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.103, which references the figures provided by the National Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South Africa's data (Appendix D-1).

7. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the MiniOver 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159 states that 4,210 were produced. This is confirmed in Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.103.

8. Production numbers provided in MM Older Vehicle Production Digest - Cars and LDVs pre-77.

9. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159. See also MK3 changeover confirmed through general sources such as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mini.

10. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102-103.

11. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.100.

12. Based on observations made of GTS vehicles during research.

13. Based on observations made of GTS vehicles during research.

14. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

15. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

16. Confirmed in discussions on samini.co.za forum discussion plus see also Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

17. Based on accounts of vehicle owners, and confirmed in Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

18. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

19. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

20. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

21. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

22. This information is based on vehicles sighted during research, and accounts of several GTS enthusiasts  and owners.

23. Per the original Mini GTS advertisement as displayed in section 7 of this guide.

24. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

25. Based on vehicles sighted and accounts from current owners and enthusiasts. Also confirmed in Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102, however – this publication does not confirm the changeover of September 1978.

26. This is an assumed date based on vehicles sighted.

27. Based on a small number of vehicles sighted and forum discussion confirming the same on samini.co.za.

28. Based on vehicles sighted during research.

29. Based on vehicles sighted and confirmed by several current owners. See Also Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

30. Mainland, K (2015) Classic Mini Specials and Moke, Marlborough UK, The Crowood Press.

31. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159 and Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.99 and p.101.

32. Confirmed based on cars sighted and owners confirming the same.

33. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

34. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

35. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

36. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

37. Based on forum information, however, some enthusiasts have suggested the heated rear window was introduced later

38. Confirmed by an original car owner.

39. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159.

40. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.100 notes 1979, but we have been advised that Sep 1979 was the beginning of the 79 model year. 

41. based on cars sighted and confirmed by Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

42. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

43. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.100. 

44. Based on discussion from samini.co.za and confirmed by several vehicle owners during research.

45. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

46. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

47. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101. 

48. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102. 

49. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

50. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102.

51. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story, and based on cars sighted and several owners confirming their opinions on the specifications.

52. Advice provided by owner of earlier and later model cars. This has not been confirmed by any official factory sources.

53. See http://www.austinminiwebsearch.com/clubmanGTS.html, as well as several colours suggested as being available on forum discussion on samini.co.za.

54. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.102 – 103.

55. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.103.

56. Based on vehicles sighted and several enthusiasts confirming the same.

57. Based on several vehicles sighted and details submitted by owners.

58. Base on discussion found on a forum samini.co.za.

59. As detailed in Issue 26, The Mini Experience (Extract found at: http://www.bmcexperience.com.au/issue-26/1275gt), referencing Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story.

60. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.168.

61. Tipler, J. (1994) Mini Cooper - The Real Thing, Dorset UK, Veloce Publishing.

62. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.168 and Car South Africa Magazine, January 1974 issue, p.32 and specifications provided in provided in MM Older Vehicle Production Digest - Cars and LDVs pre-77.

63. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159

64. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159

65. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159 and information on http://www.austinminiwebsearch.com/clubmanGTS.html

66. See the Pre 77 vehicles guide containing ratios.

67. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story, confirming the brake booster is a different unit to the Cooper S unit.

68. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

69. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

70. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.101.

71. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159

72. Rees, C. (2016) The Complete Catalogue of the Mini – Over 500 Variants From Around The World, Devon UK, Herridge & Sons Ltd, p.159

73. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.100 - 101.

74. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.100.

75. Verster, R. (2007) Thanks for the Mini Memories – A South African Mini Story p.100.